The Berlin VW Bus Festival 2019

14 10 2019

In mid-August we rigged-up Taiga Lily, our 1976 Volkswagen bay window camper, with the bike rack in the back, an extended roofrack on top, and Henrietta, our 1981 QEK Junior mini camper on the tow bar, and started the 70-km-ride to Jueterbog, south of Berlin, to the Berlin VW Festival 2019. Henrietta has now been upgraded with a nice little awning and we bought a foldable outside kitchen block.

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Next morning, we joined a convoy of 31 buses and a beetle through the nearby villages. Pretty exciting to ride with so many buses, with six motor bike guards driving in front and behind us to block all crossings, so that we could pass through in one group. All completed with a final group photo, back at the festival side, in front of one of the big old hangars of this ex-German and ex-Russian military airport site.

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Notice the prominent position our Taiga Lily who was kindly manouvered into the front row. As always, there were loads and loads of T3 and T4 buses at this meeing. But with my excitement for the aircooled earlier generations, I will start with a completely biased selection of almost all of the T1 split window busses and T2 bay window busses that were also around. So here they come!

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T1 split window single cab

The T1 Samba Bus below, from between 1964 and 1967 later on became the winner of this years show and shine competition!

Here comes a 1978 late bay Westaflia camper in Taiga Lily’s sage green (Taiga grün L63H):

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Here comes a beautiful 1975 late bay camper which is, for once, not a Westfalia:

And an impressive semi-rat look 1970 early bay window (T2a) Westfalia camper, at some point re-imported from the US, with the weathered original paint job conserved with a layer of Owatrol:

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On we move to the T3 vanagon buses of the 1980s and early 1990s. As a start a cool family group shot: On the right a 1978 air-cooled T2b, in the middle a 1980 T3 pick up truck which is also still air-cooled (in German: a “Lufti”), and on the right a later and water-cooled T3 syncro all-wheel drive camper:

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And some photos of the many T3 campervans and the many impressive four-wheel-drive T3 Syncro buses:

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Again a very nice summer weekend. And like last year, the goodies-bag for every participant contained this very cool VW bus biscuits pack – the organizers apparently had asked the cookies company Leibniz and they kindly produced another batch of these bisquits explicitely for this bus gathering – how very cool is this!





The 11th Berlin VW Bus Festival!

16 12 2018

Another kombi overload! On August 17 me and my two wonder daughters made it to this year’s Berlin VW Bus Festival! A beautiful camping weekend, wonderful sunshine and lots and lots of buses. As in the years before, the majority of buses were the VW T3 buses of the 1980s and early 1990s, with a growing share of T4, T5 and T6 buses. And my own selection of photos is again very much biased towards the two handfuls of T2 bay window buses. Hope you enjoy the photos!

It starts with our camp, our 1976 bay window bus Taiga Lily and additional space with a big bus tent. The box on the roof rack was the favorite spot of my two little daughters this year!

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There were lots of beautiful four-wheel-drive T3 syncro buses:

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Couple of interesting VW bus-caravan combinations:

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T3 Westfalia Joker campervan with an Eriba Puck caravan.

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T5 Campervan with a tear-drop caravan.caravan.

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T4 double cabin truck with the cabin of an East German QEK Aero caravan bolted to the flat-bed.

Also a couple of coach-built campervan conversions I do not see that often on German roads, based on T3 and T5 single- or double-cabin pick up trucks (the T5-based one is a Karmann Motorhome):

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A Westfalia “Sven Hedin” campervan, based on the Volkswagen LT, the big brother of the VW T3 bus:

And Luise, the longest T3 stretch-limo made an appearance again, after it won “best van of the festival” at this same festival 6 years ago:

Photos of all (or at least most) of the T2 bay window busses and the one split window bus at the festival:

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The festival takes place on the site of a old Russian army airfield. The runway is used each year for a fun race over the quarter mile:

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T3 double cabin racing a Schwalbe (East German scooter) on the quarter-mile race track.

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And it ends with a show and shine event on Saturday evening where everyone is invited to bring their buses on the stage, give a quick intro on its special history or conversion details, and the van of the year is then judged based by the intensity of the applause of the crowed. This year, the two yellow T3 buses below, which drove over from Poland and Russia, respectively, made the first and second place!

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Finally, the bag with goodies that you received at arrival contained something pretty cool: This VW-dedicated set of Leipniz bisquits, which covered the first five VW bus generations, see below.

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The 10th Berlin VW Bus Festival!

27 08 2017

Last Friday saw our little family packing up and travelling some 70 km out of Berlin to an old airfield near the small town of Juterbog, to the annual Berlin VW Bus Festival. This year was the 10th anniversairy, and times are changing: While this meeting was and has always been pretty much dominated by the T3/vanagons, this year there were astonishing numbers of T4, T5 and even T6 buses attending. On the other end of the range there were about two handfuls of bay window T2 buses and one single split window T1 campervan. All these air cooled beauties dutifully photographed by the slightly biased author of these lines. We arrived on Friday afternoon, in time to set up our bus tent while the sun was still shining. Friday evening was then pouring down with rain, but Saturday and Sunday were beautifully sunny and dry. The activities were the usual ones, a 1/8 mile race down one of the old runways (the fastest buses made it in 11-12 seconds, but a bicycle rider got an impromptu extra trophy for making it in 38 secs – faster than some of the slower buses); a driving skills course for the 4WD Syncro bus lovers (this year an obstical course on the runway as the sandpit was sadly closed, for environemental reasons); kombi picture painting sessions for the small ones with a big handing over ceremony of certificates and bags with presents for all the participants, lots of life music on stage on the two evenings and a show and shine competition on Saturday night. This year I took the plunge and for the first time took part and presented our bus Taiga Lily in all her beauty to the expert audience! We did not win, but it was lots of fun. The winner of the show was a perfect shiny T3 fitted with a 12-cylinder (W12) engine which Volkswagen usually sells in Bentleys and the Phaeton. Hard to win against such competition 🙂 Hope you will enjoy the pictures below!

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This beauty is a 1977 T2b bay window bus from Switzerland. Love the color, ocean blue!

A reoccuring theme were ex-army buses, which are auctioned off by the German Army when their time is up. In the past these have usually been T3s, this year the first T4s showed up:

Another theme were ex-german postal service high roof vans. They originally came in (West-)German Postal Yellow, as panel vans (no side windows in the rear)  and with permanent high roofs where the sliding door extended into the roof, to allow quick access to the packages in the back without having to bend down while entering. Today these buses are usually re-sprayed in other colors but you can often spot the original yellow on the inside.

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A mint green and a blue ex-German postal service camper.

And then there was this very special late bay window camper from 1979 (probably with the 1600 ccm 50 h.p. engine) which started its life with the Swiss Postal Service: The usual high roof panel van, also with the sliding door extending into the high roof, this time on a T2b base, but with right-hand steering in a country where cars usually come with left-hand steering. This set-up made it easier and safer for the post man to hop out of the car and empty the post box. Lots of nice original details on the dash board (1050 kg cargo capacity, original pull switch for the Webasto additional heater, reminder that the allowed maximum speed was 100 km/h).

There were a couple of buses that came with a QEK Junior, a caravan from East Germany which was developed to be light enough to be towed by a Trabant, the east German equivalent to the VW beetle. They were apparently produced in two versions were which weighed empty 360 and 400 kg, with a maximum weight of 400 and 500 kg, respectively. This is light enough even for our late bay window bus, so we keep thinking of adding one to our Taiga Lily when the kids get older.

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Also very cool: Volkswagen LT trucks, designwise to me always the big brothers of the T3s, built between 1975 and 1995, here rebuilt into camper vans with high roofs and as the 4×4 versions. Hadn’t noticed these at all in previous festivals, and here there were two of these giants. Pretty cool beasts!

Here is the only split window that made it to this show: A panel van from 1961, with doors in the back on both sides, which came up from South Germany. Wonder if this van was originally used by a fire brigade, with the red top, the red bumpers and the coat of arms on the driver’s door?

And a couple more beautiful bay window T2bs: A sage green (Taiga Gruen) bay window Westfalia camper in great condition:

This next bay window started its life as a red delivery van. Later, one of the previous owners welded in an original T2 window frame on the left side in the middle so that a louvered window could be installed:

And another sage green sage green Westfalia campervan beauty:

A few pictures from the 1/8 Mile race track and the Synco Trail:

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Doing the dishes with a few on the race track!

And a few pictures from the Syncro Trial and some more impressive T3 Syncro buses:

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And an impressive campervan conversion from the German manufacturer Bimobil:

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And finally, Taiga Lily’s 5 min of fame, with her and us on stage at the show and shine competition:

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Taiga Lily’s big moment!

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The winner of this year’s Show and Shine: T3 bus with a W12 engine.

 

 





1969 US Westfalia Camper with an East German History

30 08 2016

 

Here is another beautiful van from the Berlin Bus Festival 2016. It is an early bay window (or T2a) Westfalia campervan from 1969. I learnt a bit about its history when I had a chat with the owner, a friendly elderly gentleman. The bus was originally built for the US market and also exported to the US. From the paper work he found in the bus, he thinks it was brought to Germany in 1972 by a student from the US who used it to tour Europe. It probably broke down in East Germany – I guess not necessarily a standard tourist destination for an American tourist in the seventies, as you had to apply for visas etc. to get behind the iron curtain. The bus then stayed in East Germany, changed hands three times in the seventies or early 80ies until in 1982 the current owner bought it in East Berlin. He said it was quite run down at that time and needed a lot of repair, which was hard work, with very limited access to spare parts from West Germany. Seven years later the wall came down, and another 27 years later he still owns the bus and proudly keeps it running. What an amazing history!

A couple of interesting details: A sticker in the driver’s door indicates the bus was once maintained by Herb’s Garage in Newark, Delaware, southwest of Philadelphia. The label on the electricity inlet is in English (and expects 110 V instead of 240V) and the speedometer is in MPH instead of km/h, but interestingly the reminder on the steering wheel attachment, below the speedo, is in German (“Fahren nur mit verriegelter Schiebetür” / “Drive only when sliding door is locked”). The original middlewave/MW radio is still in its place in the dashboard. A more useful FM radio is installed below the dashboard. Stick-on headrest for the driver – I actually remember those from a Lada when we were visiting friends in East Germany in the 1980ies! The back indicators looked unusual. Turns out they are made in GDR (label “DDR Ruhla”) and in fact are the front indicators of a late model Trabant, the prototypical East German car. The additional rear fog and reverse lights may also be of East German origin, then.

 

 





The Berlin VW Bus Festival 2016!

28 08 2016

We spent last weekend at this year’s Berlin VW Bus Festival, on an old airfield about 60 km south of Berlin. It was the first camping event for us this year, and also the first one as a family, with parents and now two children, in the small bus. We set up the big bus tent we bought last year and used it a bit as veranda, but mainly as a shed to put away all the kid’s related equipment. We had mixed weather with great sunshine and also some serious rain, but all doable when there is a dry tent and bus. Wonder-daughter enjoyed her very special bunk bed above the driver’s and passenger seats and discovered two routes to climb up to the roof rack – via the passenger door window and via the sliding door, using the Porta Potti box as base camp. Great to see her so happy and excited about the bus!

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With a one-year-old and a 4-year-old on board, we skipped the four-wheel-drive syncro trial on Saturday morning and instead took part in the kid’s program, bouncing castle and kombi painting. Turned into a whole-family event, with a beautiful hippie buy as our joint outcome:

Over the years the mix of buses at this meeting has slowly changed from almost exclusively T3 to now still mostly T3, but with large numbers of T4s and T5s thrown in the mix, while there was just a handful of late bay window buses and only one T1. So my slightly biased selection of fotos below shows basically all the air-cooled buses that attended.

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On the T3 end, again very many of the four-wheel-drive syncro buses, and many of them trimmed for serious all-terrain action. Here is a truely awesome one, from a visitor from the Netherlands:

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The Czeck Syncro club came with around 9 of these monsters. Very cool!

And there was something I haven’t seen before: A T4 syncro with a seroius all terrain attitude – cool!

We had a great weekend – thanks to the crew from the Berlin Kombi club for organizing such a great meeting! See you again next year!

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The 9th Berlin VW Bus Festival starting tomorrow!

18 08 2016

It is this time of year again – tomorrow the 9th Berlin VW Bus Festival will open its gates in Jueterbog, a bit south of Berlin. I have just carried a movable kitchen block from the cellar into Taiga Lily and started loading the camping gear. Tomorrow we will start for a two-day kombi party! If you want to join, all details can be found on the festivals web site, www.vwbus-treffen-berlin.de. Hope to see you there!

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The 8th Berlin VW Bus Festival coming soon!

2 08 2015

It is time again for the next Berlin VW Bus Festival! This year celebrates the Syncro, the four-wheel drive version of the T3 which has turned 30 this year. The festival will start on Friday, August 14 on a former airfield in Jueterbog, about 70 km south of Berlin. Check out the festival web site for all details, http://www.vwbus-treffen-berlin.de/ Sadly I will miss out this year. We will be on a family reunion. But I am sure this will be a spectacular meeting, so go and enjoy!

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Awesome 1969 Early Bay Westfalia Camper

21 03 2015

Spotted this truly beautiful Early Bay Camper at last year’s Berlin Bus Festival. It is from 1969. The Westfalia badge quotes the “Year of Manufacturer” as 1970 which will then be the year of conversion. The color is probably light grey (I345). The van lived most of its life in California and was re-imported and then restored in Germany only recently. Speedo with “MPH” instead of “Km/h” and “Emergency” on the hazard light pull switch and yellow and red reflectors on the sides of the van as details for the US-American market. Beautiful original wooden campervan interior. Interesting exhaust pipe construction to funnel the exhaust fumes of the gas fridge out through the ceiling. 1600 ccm B5 engine with 47 horse power. Looks a bit unusual that the spare tire is in the rear and reduces the bed space. Would have expected it to be at the front of the car. But hey, might be original as well.
The bus is now the pride of a fleet of about 3 kombis of “Old Berlin Bulli”, a new VW bus rental company in Berlin. They offer kombis with chauffeur service for city tours, weddings and film sets. Some more technical details on this campervan (“Mr. Alvah”) here on their web site. The slightly bumpy company name probably stems from Volkswagen’s strategy to come after you if you use “Bulli” in your company name. In Germany “Bulli” is the well-known and very positive nick name for the VW kombi. Volkswagen purchased the rights to this name only in 2007 and since then enforces that only VW is allowed to use it. As I understand, you have to add something like “Old” or “Classic” to your Bulli-related company name to get the official approval of VW. This seems what these guys have done as there is a little “Officially licensed by Volkswagen” note on the footer of all their web sites. Anyway, nice to see some kombi/bulli lovers have found a way to make a living of the kombi. And cool that they keep this beautiful bus in good shape and on the road!

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The Berlin VW Bus Festival 2014!

23 08 2014

Last weekend Leon Dogwonder and I made it to the 2014 Berlin VW Bus Festival on an old airfield in Jueterbog, south of Berlin. Relaxed camping weekend in the bus, luckily less hot than last year, with lots of buses to check out and nice people to meet. In total about 450 buses, with the occasional late bay window between lots and lots of T3/T25s. The usual program, with people racing their buses and other vehicles on the old air field (1/8 mile), with a sand pit playground for the 4WD Syncro buses to test what they can handle, a show and shine competition and kiddie’s program. Great Weekend – hope you will enjoy the photos! Greetings to Jan, Kerstin, Flo, Heiko und Meike!

This samba  won "best van of the festival"

This samba won “best van of the festival”

1974 ex-Red Cross ambulance microbus turned campervan

1974 ex-Red Cross ambulance microbus turned campervan

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Another ex-ambulance van, this one from 1976

Another ex-ambulance van, this one from 1976

Nice and clean T3/T25 bus...

Nice and clean T3/T25 bus…

... and its VR6 Volkswagen 6-cylinder engine.

… and its VR6 Volkswagen 6-cylinder engine.

"Can't go fast - but everywhere"

“Can’t go fast – but everywhere”

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Spectators at the start of the Syncro Trial...

Spectators at the start of the Syncro Trial…

... and a syncro coming to the rescue of another one, stuck in the sand.

… and a syncro coming to the rescue of another one, stuck in the sand.

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About to present the results of an afternoon of hard crafting...

About to present the results of an afternoon of hard crafting…

And some of their beautiful products!

And some of their beautiful products!

Start of the 1/8 mile race, T3 vanagon against a Ford Mustang.

At the start line of the 1/8 mile race, T3 vanagon against a Ford Mustang.

My friend's 1992 T3 Bluestar, Leon Dogwonder and Taiga Lily

My friend’s 1992 T3 Bluestar, Leon Dogwonder and Taiga Lily

Leon guarding our Taiga Lily.

Leon guarding our Taiga Lily.

Leon allowed on the bed - a very special weekend.

Allowed on the bed – a very special weekend.





1956 Samba with Matching Trailer

2 08 2013

I spotted this beauty last weekend at the Berlin Bus Festival and thought it deserved its own blog post. Judging from the vanity plates, the Samba bus is from 1956 and the hearse trailer from 1961. The bus is a pre-1960 23-window early Samba with semaphores in the B columns. The additional indicators on the front must have been added later, after they became available in 1960 (some snapshots of another beautiful 23-window Samba here). The trailer started its life as a hearse and has now been re-sprayed in matching colors and turned into a tow-behind bedroom. Perhaps a bit spooky to sleep in an ex-hearse. But it’s a beautiful bus-trailer combination, and you can keep the bus in its original nine-seater condition and still use it for camping.

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