Taiga Lily’s Fifteen Minutes of Fame

27 06 2015

This weekend, all Volkswagen dealers in Berlin presented the new generation of the VW bus, the T6, to the public. To emphasize Volkswagen’s long history of building the bus, they organized that in each showroom an old kombi, T1 or T2, was present as well. And Taiga Lily was one of the chosen ones! So Thursday I had a long summer evening and night of washing, polishing and vacuum cleaning. Friday morning she went to the VW dealer in Berlin Tegel. I picked her up again this afternoon, together with our eldest daughter, and we had some good father-daughter bonding over kombis. Though our little one was most excited about the large box of chocolate kombis we were given at the very end. We came prepared – check out our kombi T-shirts! What an exciting weekeend!

Image_5

Image_3

Getting all shiny and clean!

Getting all shiny and clean!

Image_2

Image_4





They finally stop making them…

30 12 2013

Sad news for the kombi world: As you may have read already on ZeroToSixty-eventually or in the newspapers, Volkswagen of Brazil will stop the production of the kombi (aka the Bay Window Volkswagen bus or T2) at the end of 2013, so basically today. In Germany, the production of this version of the Volkswagen transporter started in 1967 and ended in 1979 when the wedge-shaped T3/T25 was introduced, which in turn was succeeded by the front-engine T4 in 1990 and the current model, the T5, in 2003. But production went on in Mexico and Brazil, in Mexico until 1994 and in Brazil up until now.
The body of these modern versions showed only minor differences compared to the German kombis of the 1970ies, like a slightly elevated roof, small differences on the lower section of the driver and passenger door and, most prominently, a large radiator grill at the front as these buses were equipped with water-cooled engines since 2005. The German Wikipedia entry on the T2 has a section on the Mexican and Brazilian T2, the “T2c” for which unfortunately no English translation exists yet.
Production now ends because of increased safety and emission standards. From 2014 on all new cars in Brazil need to feature airbag safety systems. Apparently too difficult to introduce such a complex system in a car where the basic design goes back to 1967. Volkswagen Do Brazil commemorates 56 years of production of the Kombi in Brazil with a beautiful final Last Edition – originally limited to 600 buses, then increased to 1200 buses, see the photos below.
Some links if you want to read more: This New York Times article beautifully sums up why the kombi was so successful – because it was, in a modest and unpretentious way, sufficient. There is an informative article from Automotive.com (“The Bus Stops Here”) where also the photos below are taken from. Here is a link to an article in the British newspaper The Indendent. Finally a gallery of photos, some truely beautiful, on the web site of the british newspaper The Guardian.

Photos below from Volkswagen of Brazil.

Volkswagen-Kombi-Last-Edition-Front-Quarter

Volkswagen-Kombi-Last-Edition-Rear

Volkswagen-Kombi-Last-Edition-Badge

Volkswagen-Kombi-Last-Edition-Interior





San Diego Surfer Short Bus

10 07 2012

Here is a bus a friend spotted in May in San Diego. Looks like the middle section of a T2a has been cut out and the rest welded back together again. Massive rust at the upper front, below the windscreen, in places where they would never rust in Germany (here they die from the lower edges upwards, from the salt on the roads in the winter months). A bit of a rat look, the rusty front combined with shiny new alloy wheels. Thanks to Oliver for the photos! The bus belongs to Hodad’s burger restaurant in San Diego, and the link shows another cool shot of the bus, with its owner. For a another unusual shortened bus, check out the web site of VW Short Bus: A 1966 split-window, shortened not by the length of a sliding door of a T2 but by about half a meter, the width of one side cargo door of a T1.

´