1972 Australian Post Delivery Van

2 04 2017

This is something like one of those famous „barn findings“: A 1972 Volkswagen panel van that started out as delivery van for the Australian Postal service, at that time (and until 1975) still called the Post Master General’s Department or PMG. In 1975 it had an accident, was put aside and forgotten. When I saw the van at a VW garage in Geelong in December 2015, the owner had bought it still with the accident marks (rear right corner bumped in), but otherwise in very original (and very dusty) condition, and the plan was to keep it original as well. The damage to the rear right corner was fixed already. A different engine was built in as a temporary fix (not sure if the original engine was lost or beyond repair). The van was already registered and roadworthy, with a “Victoria club permit” for classic cars. The speedometer showed 35.935 miles which may really have been the true mileage, seeing that the van was only on the road between 1972 to 1975. It also showed hardly any serious rust, and what rust there was looked like surface rust rather than a deeper problem, e.g. on the roof in the rear right.

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This kombi is one of the “T2ab hybrid” buses from 1971/72 with a mix of features from both of the early bay window T2a buses (indicators on the front still down, front bumper still of the rounder type and end serving as door steps) and the late bay window T2b buses (more rectangular air intakes on the sides in the rear, rectangular and not oval back lights). Not sure if the T2b hub cups here are original, thought that the T2ab buses still came with the cups from the early bay buses (see e.g. this early bay van) . The letters “PMG” for Post Master General on the front doors were probably officially removed when the van was taken out of service, but they are still faintly visible on the front doors.

Some interesting details: Aluminum-coated insulation mats on the walls in the rear. Wonder if this was original at the time? Perhaps for the Australian market with the local hotter temperatures? Nice and probably also original feature: Little plate with “Accident free driving is our aim”, white on postal-red background, in the center of the dashboard. Otherwise no frills, probably typical for vans bought for the public service: Glove box without lid, no radio and the slot still closed with original cover. Small triangle windows in the front doors cannot be opened. In Germany, at least for the late bay window busses, such minimally equipped panel vans came with the outer rear view mirrors and the wheels and hub cups sprayed in the same color as the car (instead of chrome or silver color coat).





1975 Fire Truck

12 05 2013

Passed this van today and had to stop to take a closer look. A late bay panel van that seemed to have been used by the fire brigade in the North German small town of Moormerland, close to the Dutch border. The English Wikipedia link is pretty minimalistic, more on this town in the German entry). The bus comes with the 1600 cc 50 h.p. engine and sliding doors on both sides. Looks like work in progress, or a rat look in the making: Rust already removed and some major welding works done, rock and roll bed installed in the back, but body not yet re-sprayed. The bus is now registered in the Netherlands. Haven’t seen a Dutch registration with white numbers yet, but learnt that it is reserved for classic cars, older than 1978. Seems she has found a new owner who will hopefully help her survive the next few decades.

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