Geelong Rat-Look Single Cab

15 02 2014

Here comes a split-window pick up truck, spotted November 2013 in Geelong, Australia, by kombi correspondent Campbell. Still with semaphores instead of indicators, so pre-1960. Does not seem to have much in terms of rear lights at all. Just realized that I actually had seen this bus already in Dec 2011, also in Geelong, at that time with a registration that said it was from 1956. Here is the link to the old post. Seems the bus has changed hands since then. Now it comes with a club permit registration. And someone replaced the original wheels with shiny chrome ones. Looks like a lot of work to get it back to rust-free condition. But then the rat-look also is pretty cool. Thanks to Campbell for the photos!

Image1

Image2

Image3

Image4





The last bus finds a home

2 02 2014




Taiga Lily embroidered…

1 02 2014

I re-discovered this beautiful piece when we sorted our study in the christmas break. Got it as a present from DrJ who stitched it in about 2011, black thread on paper. It comes in our buses’ original paint job, Taigagruen (sage green) and white. For more stitch art of DrJ check out Stitchalicious and her Etsy shop.

Image_1

Image_2

Image_3





Australian Kombi Commercial

30 01 2014

Another nice kombi commercial, this time with a beautiful Australian surfer bus. The earl bays do grow on me. Just this little bit more of a classic car than the late bays. Below a snapshot and the YouTube video. Thanks to Tony for the link!

Image_1





Peppa Pig and the Campervan

24 01 2014

I had never heard of Peppa Pig before our little supergirl introduced me. Very cute british cartoon that explains the world clearly understandable for a two-year-old. And there is even something in it for the kombi nerd – two episodes where Peppa and her family discover the joy of camping in a campervan. Which, only weakly disguised, turned out to be a Volkswagen bus. Girst I was a bit unsure but then the engine in the back clearly gave it away. The side ways-fold up roof would make it a dormobile campervan conversion. Below are some screenshots and the youtube links. Hope you like it as well!

Image1

Image4





Happy New Year!

2 01 2014

Let the year begin with this beautiful double cabin pick up truck: Spotted last week by kombi correspondent Matti in Los Realejos on the Spanish island of Tenerife which is part of the Canary Islands. A Late Bay model, probably from 1973 (country plate on the rear bumper). It belongs to workers of a local church – with their own “church parking” symbol painted on the street, and a crucifix dangling from the rear view mirror – nice touch. Beautiful condition, with what looks like a new paint job in neptune blue, and complete down to every detail: shiny hub caps with additional chrome rim rings, new rubber bands on both bumpers, mud flaps in the back. Perhaps recently restored? Wishing you all a Happy New Year and all the best for 2014!

Image_2

Image_1

Image_3





Até amanhã ?

31 12 2013

unintroducing-thevolkswagen-bus2013

Re-blog of a great blog post. Brilliant summary, with a fantastic VW unlaunch ad, “unintroducing the Volkswagen Bus…”

Wild about Scotland

unintroducing-thevolkswagen-bus2013

[Note: Até amanhã ? = ‘See you tomorrow?’ in Portuguese]

This month the last newly-produced T2 Volkswagen bus is due to roll off the production in Brazil.  It’s the end of an era having been in continuous production for 64 years with 3.5 million sold around the world.  Whether you know it as a camper, bus, kombi or van, it’s a vehicle that has stood the test of time.  It’s cheeky looks, durability, flexibility and simple mechanics mean that they just keep on going … and going …. and going.

The demise of the Bay window T2 bus has been shrouded in some mystery for the last fortnight, however.  VW’s decision to cease production is in response to new regulations requiring ABS brakes and airbags to be fitted to all new vehicles in Brazil.  But the recent suggestion by Brazil’s Finance Minister that the VW bus might be exempt, given that it’s…

View original post 366 more words